What is left to say about Auschwitz

What do you wear to Auschwitz?

Not your cut off Levi’s you bought in Valencia.  Shorts feel inappropriate somehow.  Neither can you wear your beloved Chacos.  The thought of your toes touching the same dirt that they labored and died on feels disrespectful.  Jeans, a navy top, and covered shoes it is then, even though it’ll be 80+ degrees.


How do you talk at Auschwitz?

You don’t.  Other than an “excuse me” when you bump into people, you stay silent.  There is something restricting your throat.


How do you take pictures at Auschwitz?

Very carefully.  No selfies, no snaps of areas that feel too personal, still somehow too vulnerable.  You say no to the man that wants you to take a picture of him in front of the gas chamber replica.  He’s confused, thinks you don’t know English, because he then tries to show you how to use a phone camera (you have an iPhone 7 in your hand).  You say no again and move on.


How do you cry at Auschwitz?

You don’t.  The few times you tear up, someone near you cracks a joke or says something to their partner.  Another time.  You’ll be back when it’s winter and less people are around.  There’s way too many people around to focus on the tragedy in front of you.


What is there left to say about Auschwitz?

Nothing, except we must never let it happen again.